Dating owens illinois bottles

With this hub, I am going to focus on the methods used by the Owens-Illinois (O-I) Company, and show you how to date your glass finds using the symbols and numbers indicative of the O-I company.

(Sorry I don't have better pictures, the glass is quite old and had been in the water for quite some time.However, without having more of the glass, I am unable to narrow that down to a specific year.If that was the end of it, this would be a pretty lame blog post, but as it stands I am a fairly curious person and couldn't help digging a little deeper.The plant code is of no use either to help narrow down the date.The number 17 is for a plant in Clarion, Pennsylvania which has been in operation since 1932 and is still presently producing bottles.

Dating owens illinois bottles

Coca-Cola and Pepsi-Cola didn't always adhere to the Owens-Illinois policies, and often had their dates on the heel, and not the bottom, of the glass.(Society for Historical Archaeology) However, what we do know is that Pepsi and Coke now come in plastic bottles or aluminum cans.(I am also a giant nerd and find this stuff fascinating.) I will never know exactly what year the previous glass was manufactured, but while digging I discovered that I owned pieces, that with a lot of persistence, could be dated to a specific year. Dating owens illinois bottles-87Dating owens illinois bottles-32Dating owens illinois bottles-22 But first a little about the The history is a little confusing, and as is usual of the internet, varies from website to website, with each website having their own sources, and their own account of what happened.What first led me down this path of discovery was a small piece of glass I found washed up on my local creek with the word “where the surface of the hot, just produced bottles, were sprayed on the body, shoulder, and neck (not base or the top of the finish) with a stannic chloride (Tin (IV) chloride) vapor that allowed the tin to bond to the outer surface providing scratch resistance and durability to the bottles." (Lindsey, B.) Though this process is still in use today, the word was embossed on bottles only between 1940 and the mid-1950s (Lindsey, B).

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